About Amy

About Amy

I am a cook, author, and urban farmer. I currently live in Seattle. I am all for LIVING GREEN! I am also a speaker, teacher, TV show host and a handful of other 'jobs' that revolve around food, farms and the environment. Here is how it all began...

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Articles

Seattle Magazine

Tilikum Place Chef's Favorite Ingredient: Walnut Vinegar

Seattle Magazine, Oct 2014

A fortuitous souvenir brought back from France by her sister led Ba Culbert, chef and co-owner of Tilikum Place Café, to one of her dearest ingredients-walnut vinegar. While not a fan of other flavored vinegars, Culbert immediately loved how walnut vinegar has a "subtle and nuanced flavor that keeps dishes light."

Edible Seattle

Seeing Red - Preserving Cranberries

Edible Seattle, Nov 2012

By now, we know that the Pacific Northwest is an absolute cornucopia of farm fresh produce, so when I stumble on a new fruit or vegetable at the farmers market, it's a thrilling occasion. Last year I stopped in my tracks when I passed an unadorned table at the Broadway Farmers Market simply piled with big wooden boxes and a small bowl of cranberries. 

Edible Seattle

Quintessentially Quince

Edible Seattle, Nov 2011

The late-ripening quince provides us with the last canning opportunity of the year. Amy Pennington's recipe results in two delicious outcomes: a fragrant syrup, and a rich fruit paste.

Fresh From The Blog

HOW TO :: Harvest Rose Hips & Dry for Recipes

Posted November 19

rose hips for harvestingWith the recent autumnal frosts, now is the perfect time to collect rose hips. A bit of frost sweetens them up. Rose hips offer a subtle floral flavor to dishes, but their real power is in the health benefits they possess. Rose hips contain more vitamin C then most other herbs – even many times those found in citrus pound per pound. These antioxidant, red globes, are best harvested in late fall and used in syrups or jams.

Rose hips look like little tomatoes, often orange-red and shiny. They are more round than long, about the size of a red globe grape. Harvest rose hips by snapping the stem from the plant. They are tough enough that you can toss them into a plastic bag and then a backpack without doing too much damage. Rinse them well when you get home to drown out any bugs and use them within a day of bringing them home.

Following is a quick guide on how to harvest and dry rose hips. Their chewy skins can be used in tonics, jams or... Read more from the blog...

Events

Mar 15

5:01 am
my urban pantry
stay tuned!

Kombucha, Ginger Beer, Yogurt & Kefir - Homemade Fermentation

Seems like we're all moving toward healthier diets and incorporating pro-biotics into the mix. Come learn how to ferment delicious & safe recipes for yourself and your family at this 2-hour course on home fermentation. We will make kombucha, see Read More...

Apr 26

1:00 pm
my urban pantry
stay tuned!

Rhubarb Burst

Rhubarb .....Sure, they're great with strawberries and in pie, but let's dig a little deeper. Discover the hidden flavors of this spring vegetable in a 2-hour hands-on cooking class focused on this astringent vegetable. You will make sweet and Read More...